February 26, 2021

PREDICTIONS FOR THE 78TH GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS (2021)—ALL TV CATEGORIES

THE CROWN, THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT and SCHITT’S CREEK will win the big prizes. Find out why, and take a look at other predictions for the TV categories, at Sunday’s Golden Globe Awards


Best drama series

THE CROWN
LOVECRAFT COUNTRY
THE MANDALORIAN
OZARK
RATCHED

THE CROWN has won before, for its first season, but not since. Although the HFPA do like to give it to new shows or those that haven’t won before, this last season of THE CROWN probably started a lot more conversations than its debut season did, and it was probably as good—even arguably better than the other two seasons in between that didn’t win. THE MANDALORIAN could also win here, but I suspect they will crown the right show.

 

Best comedy series

EMILY IN PARIS
THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT
THE GREAT
SCHITT’S CREEK
TED LASSO

There are some great contenders here. I would give it to any of these shows (not EMILY IN PARIS though). TED LASSO stands a good chance, and I believe its time will come. But, this is SCHITT’S’ year. Even if there isn’t a clean sweep like we saw at the Emmys last September, I do believe this big prize will go to the show for its sweet swansong.

 

Best limited or anthology series, or TV movie

NORMAL PEOPLE
THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT
SMALL AXE
THE UNDOING
UNORTHODOX

I think this one’s going to come down to THE UNDOING or THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT. I believe the latter was the superior show of the two. And then it also became the most-watched limited series ever on Netflix. It also checks a lot of awards boxes—troubled protagonist, orphan, substance abuse, period drama, underdog story, and so on. But it was actually much more than that, and I think it would definitely deserve to win. 

 

Best actress in a drama series

Olivia Colman ● THE CROWN
Jodie Comer ● KILLING EVE
Emma Corrin ● THE CROWN
Laura Linney ● OZARK
Sarah Paulson ● RATCHED

She played one of the most beloved public figures of our times, in a show that has been the talk of the town, after years of viewers waiting to see Diana’s story in it, and she nailed the role of the princess, with all her vulnerabilities. Emma Corrin is winning this one. Though I wish Olivia Colman would, since this is also her last season as the royal. But Corrin played Diana with charm and sensitivity—and that’s what Diana was known for, so she’d deserve it.

 

Best actor in a drama series

Jason Bateman ● OZARK
Josh O’Connor ● THE CROWN
Bob Odenkirk ● BETTER CALL SAUL
Al Pacino ● HUNTERS
Matthew Rhys ● PERRY MASON

Josh O’Connor is winning this one, again, for being a part of such a big story covered in THE CROWN season four, which we’d all been waiting for, for years. He was also really good, portraying the angst and arrogance with such conviction, and doing such a thorough job with the diction and body language of the Prince of Wales. He’s up against some big names, so it will be all the more special for him, and a very interesting awards result indeed.  

 

Best actress in a comedy series

Lily Collins ● EMILY IN PARIS
Kaley Cuoco ● THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT
Elle Fanning ● THE GREAT
Jane Levy ● ZOEY’S EXTRAORDINARY PLAYLIST
Catherine O’Hara ● SCHITT’S CREEK

This could very easily go to Kaley Cuoco for THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT, especially since the HFPA have been known to award fresh faces and shows, as opposed to frontrunners. However, this is still SCHITT’S CREEK’s awards cycle. Even if none of the other actors from the show win Globes, I have a strong feeling Catherine O’Hara definitely will. She was exceptional as Moira Rose. Besides, O’Hara hasn’t won before in this category, so it will still be a fresh face.

 

Best actor in a comedy series

Don Cheadle ● BLACK MONDAY
Nicholas Hoult ● THE GREAT
Eugene Levy ● SCHITT’S CREEK
Jason Sudeikis ● TED LASSO
Ramy Youssef ● RAMY

Emmy winner Eugene Levy is a strong contender here, and I won’t be surprised if he wins. However, TED LASSO is going to get some Globes love, and even if this isn’t its year for best series, I think Jason Sudeikis will take the win for the show in this category. And he’ll deserve it for bringing such sincerity and heart to the role.

 

Best actress in a limited or anthology series, or TV movie

Cate Blanchett ● MRS. AMERICA
Daisy Edgar-Jones ● NORMAL PEOPLE
Shira Haas ● UNORTHODOX
Nicole Kidman ● THE UNDOING
Anna Taylor-Joy ● THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT

It’s between Blanchett, Kidman and Taylor-Joy. The latter was quite a breakout success, and Anna Taylor-Joy does deserve a lot of credit for the show’s success even, as she carried THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT almost as a solo act. I believe the HFPA will see that too and give it to her.

 

Best actor in a limited or anthology series, or TV movie

Bryan Cranston ● YOUR HONOR
Jeff Daniels ● THE COMEY RULE
Hugh Grant ● THE UNDOING
Ethan Hawke ● THE GOOD LORD BIRD
Mark Ruffalo ● I KNOW THIS MUCH IS TRUE 

I think Hugh Grant stands a good chance to win this, especially since he presented such creepy villainy, which we hadn’t really seen from him before. However, Mark Ruffalo! Just seeing a show-reel of his from I KNOW… could convince anyone to give him an award for it—even the voting members of the HFPA.

 

Best supporting actress in TV series

Gillian Anderson ● THE CROWN
Helena Bonham Carter ● THE CROWN
Julia Garner ● OZARK
Annie Murphy ● SCHITT’S CREEK
Cynthia Nixon ● RATCHED

Here’s a tough race for sure. Emmy winner Annie Murphy is a frontrunner. However, THE CROWN is more recent, and Gillian Anderson was absolutely terrific as Thatcher. Just seeing her in the promo before the release of season four made me sure she’d win awards for it. And to top that, she played an iconic figure in history, in probably the most talked-about season of one of the most popular shows of our times. This role has awards written all over it.

 

Best supporting actor in TV series

John Boyega ● SMALL AXE
Brendan Gleeson ● THE COMEY RULE
Daniel Levy ● SCHITT’S CREEK
Jim Parsons ● HOLLYWOOD
Donald Sutherland ● THE UNDOING

This is a tough one to predict. The clear frontrunner is Daniel Levy, and I hope he wins. However, the HFPA tend to lean towards drama in these mixed categories, so it’s quite possible that this goes to the highly talked-about THE UNDOING’s Sutherland or THE COMEY RULE’s Gleeson. Given the recent political climate in America, I say it’ll be Gleeson.

December 29, 2020

THE BEST TV SHOWS OF 2020

As we celebrate the end of this dreadful year, I take a look back at some of the most noteworthy seasons of television that I watched in 2020 that left me awed or amused, with their refreshing stories, terrific portrayals, captivating charm or all of the above

THE CROWN

When THE CROWN first began, the idea of a new cast every two seasons seemed absurd, considering how much one connects with the actors who bring the characters to life. When season three started, it even took some adjustment to warm up to the new faces of the same royals. By season four though, it didn’t feel like they weren’t playing these characters all along, and by the end of it, I was so sad that that’s all to have seen of this cast. Of course, the additions of the Emma Corrin and Gillian Anderson have been absolutely exemplary. Their fantastic work as Diana and Maggie Thatcher brought to life some very compelling storytelling, and brought to light things that I had no idea about, such as Diana’s eating disorder and the queen's media quarrel with the prime minister, with great sensitivity. Yet, even though the queen’s story might have been in the background through some of the season, Olivia Colman continued to shine as the sovereign, especially in the episode about Michael Fagan, the palace intruder, which was one of the best of the series. Josh O’Connor’s Charles and Helena Bonham Carter’s Margaret added to the richness of a show that is always a treat on so many levels, with its nuanced dialog, and sumptuous visuals, among other aspects. Some have even called this the best season of the series, and though I’d find it hard to pick my favorite season, I’m not surprised.

THE GOOD FIGHT


THE GOOD WIFE/FIGHT are among the best TV shows (or franchises) made, and till date it baffles me how good the former was, despite churning out 22 episodes a year. Still, on network TV, it had its limitations, which the latter does not, being a streaming show. Considering that, THE GOOD FIGHT takes its political rhetoric and throws it on us quite blatantly and quite refreshingly at that. Even so, in its third season, they did go a little extreme with it, almost making it campy with the Melania Trump storyline and the anti-Trump secret group. What one missed was the terrific legal drama that is the heart and soul of the franchise, and I think season four not only returned us to that, but continued its rhetoric in a well-balanced and extremely clever way. The episode that dealt with Olympic qualification standards and disparity in gender, as well as issues of race, was thought-provoking and gripping. The alternate reality in the premiere, where Diane is living in world where Hillary won, was genius. And then the ‘memo 618’ and Jeffrey Epstein episodes just hit it out of the park. I’m constantly disappointed that this show doesn’t get its due, especially at the Emmys, which keep nominating the now-overrated THIS IS US, and now-ridiculous STRANGER THINGS.

THE GREAT


This ‘occasionally true story’ from the writer of The Favourite started out a bit jarring and made me cringe a little, but the visual treat that it was kept me going, and I’m glad that I did. Once you look past the extremes of the twisted humor and the political incorrectness, it’s actually quite a riot. The delightful Nicholas Hoult’s Peter III had an endearing quality, despite the emperor’s narcissism and sexism, even when he says things like, “I am of gentle heart and massive cock!” Elle Fanning took on the future Russian empress’s role with grace and conviction, and her mission to [Spoiler Alert] overthrow her husband and rule Russia herself is the hook that kept the show engaging, and made it very binge-worthy. The snappy and unapologetically hilarious dialog and the beautiful costumes and sets kept things exciting, even visually, right till the very last frame. I was just disappointed that it didn’t earn more nods or wins at the Emmys this year. Hopefully more people discover the greatness before season two premieres. Until then, huzzah!

MODERN FAMILY


Throughout its 11-season run, MODERN FAMILY was never a disappointment. Sure there were a few episodes among their 250 that weren’t as funny as the rest, but it was always a show that was consistently well written and executed, with a healthy mix of clever humor in dialog and comedy of errors one often saw. The characters were beautifully developed and each one had a distinct role to play, even as the kids grew up. And with its final season, they maintained everything that was good about the series, giving it a perfect little send-off, even though I’m sure they could have gone on with it for a few more years at least. It was equal parts emotional and entertaining, as it did justice to all the characters and their bonds with each other. It’s going down as one of my all-time favorites, and the final season simply cemented its place on that mental list I have in my head.  

Click here for a complete review of the series-ender

MRS. AMERICA


We don’t often see a strong conservative perspective on issues depicted by liberal Hollywood, and I perhaps wouldn’t even agree with that side anyway. However, to be fair, it’s never a bad idea to hear both sides of an argument and consider them. MRS. AMERICA gave us that and so much more. Despite leaning liberal, the show managed to center the narrative on a conservative protagonist, who was portrayed with infuriating perfection by Cate Blanchett, and it showed us the other side better than most shows do. I often struggle to understand how women can be conservative, especially when it comes to matters of gender equality, but now I maybe find it slightly easier to grasp where they’re coming from, owing to Phyllis Schlafly’s story, even if I was against what she was fighting for. The narrative itself was crisp, compelling and did justice to all the fine performers, each of whom got their time to shine, especially Rose Byrne, Margo Martindale, Uzo Aduba, Tracey Ullman, and Sarah Paulson, all of whom were fantastic in their roles. 

NORMAL PEOPLE


This heartbreaking and gut-wrenching dissection of the constantly evolving and very layered relationship between two people through the defining years of their lives wasn’t always easy to watch, but it was very real. Relationships that are so co-dependent almost and infused with heightened passion and other big feelings are often extremely complicated and don’t end with a ‘happily ever after’ and a neatly tied bow. It may not have been a very feel-good show, and was almost depressing and frustrating even, but it was such a tremendous character study. As they peeled back the layers of the messy and the tragic sides to the two protagonists and their relationship, the actors were fascinatingly raw and real, evoking all sorts of feelings one didn’t know one had.

THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT


I’ve never really been good at chess, nor have I bothered to learn how to play strategically. With only basic knowledge of the rules of the game, the chess aspect is not what drew me to THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT, but I soon realized I didn’t need to know more about chess than I did know in order to enjoy the show. It’s all about the fictional but very real Beth Harmon and how she overcomes inner demons and personal challenges, as she finds control and comfort in 64 squares. The brilliant characterization and the supporting cast, along with the well-paced plot obviously had major roles to play. However, it was the directing and the general treatment of the series that had this mesmerizing quality that drew me into that world very early into the series. The quieter moments depicted were particularly captivating, especially owing to Anna Taylor-Joy’s soothing screen presence and the stunning background score. It was a triumph of good writing, beautiful performances, and overall tone. I do see why it’s become Netflix’s most-watched limited series ever, and I have to admit, I am almost impressed with Netflix’s general audience for it.

SCHITT’S CREEK


Okay, I might be a little biased in including SCHITT’S here, since I did watch the entire series during the lockdown. However, I can confidently say that if I were to only consider the final season, the show would still feature on this list. With most acclaimed shows generally at their peak during their first three seasons, it rarely happens that a show’s best work is towards the end of its run. And SCHITT’S CREEK turned out to be a very fine example of that. The final season was a step up from an exemplary season four and a stellar season five, while it tied up storylines for not just the Roses, but even gave us sweet bookends to other great characters such as Stevie. It was one of the best series-enders I’ve seen, with equal doses of hilarity and heart. The show certainly went out on a big high and deserved its whopping seven Emmys (a first for a comedy series winning all the major categories). 

SEX EDUCATION


SEX EDUCATION is a breath of fresh air just like small-town UK is. With its sheer honesty in portrayal of sexual awkwardness and growth, it can evoke a few cringes along he way, but it always carries a lot of heart. The high schoolers at its center are flawed yet very relatable in many ways, and the fact that they show goes beyond the central few makes especially the second season a real triumph. Of course Gillian Anderson’s commanding presence and her intimidating humor rule each scene she’s in, but it’s also the other less important characters in school who make a mark. Connor, Lily, Ola, Jackson, and Isaac—all have distinct and even endearing parts to play. Aimee had one of the simplest yet complicated and very impactful ‘me too’ storylines told in a TV series, and it brought together the female characters like nothing else had. Of course Otis, Maeve and Eric continued to shine with strong performances by the actors. SEX EDUCATION works on a lot of levels and I hope they keep bringing us heartwarming stories about underdogs and sexual awakening with their subsequent seasons.

TED LASSO


Having never understood American football, and never really being terribly interested in football (or soccer) either, you could imagine how I was not at all drawn to this show. However, I read some very encouraging reviews of this series and several months after it was released, I went through all 10 episodes, hooked by the second one itself and absolutely cheering for Richmond through their big games, especially the Man City match! The show had a single purpose—to tell a heartfelt feel-good story about positivity and niceness, and that shone through every storyline, sub-plot, and character arc. Jason Sudeikis’ Ted Lasso stole my heart, as he killed with kindness and his uplifting spirit. All along, the humor was clever, and sharp, while the story itself was familiar, but very refreshing, as the show steered clear of some very obvious tropes, which by itself makes it a winner. However, the overall impact and its consistently endearing quality made me instantly recommend it to many. It’s proven to be a real gem of a series—certainly a lovely discovery for me. “We’re Richmond till we die…!” 

September 22, 2020

THE 2020 EMMYS: HOW THE SHOW WENT ON AND SCHITT’S CREEK TOOK IT ALL

Were the Emmys 2020 a bit lackluster? Sure! There was no larger-than-life stage set. There weren’t any elaborate sketches, musical numbers, or any kinds of performances (except for the ‘in memoriam’ segment). There was no orchestra, and there were very few presenters, as the host presented many of the categories himself. However, the biggest absence was, obviously, a live audience. 

That might have stung the most, especially so during Jimmy Kimmel’s opening monologue. The stitching together of audience reactions from footage of past shows and events was a simple but effective way to start the show, and also served as a stark reminder of how much our world has changed this year. It was quite funny, almost in a dark way, but the moment Kimmel ‘saw himself’ in the audience, and was snapped back into reality, it suddenly seemed darker still. He made a joke about it being like his prom where he was also alone, but even as a joke, his melancholic acceptance of being alone was almost disturbing. It was something that we’ve all felt at some point or another, during this pandemic, through the various versions of lockdowns and quarantine periods we’ve all experienced. It felt like a confrontation with reality amidst this ‘new normal’ that we’re all adjusting to. Yet, there is a sense of hope, an instinct for survival that makes us feel like we need to weather this storm, which isn’t going to pass anytime soon, rather than get blown away by it. It was hence refreshing in a way to see that the show was still going on, as it best could.

All things considered…
In fact, the show was more than I was expecting. What I had in mind was a mega-sized Zoom conference call, not unlike what we’ve been seeing in the lockdown editions of shows such as Kimmel’s own Jimmy Kimmel Live. Instead, there actually was a small set, with a giant Emmy statuette, live video feeds from all over the place, and just a bunch of people who took turns to present award categories and introduce other presenters. A few of the presentations might have fallen a little flat—such as Anthony Anderson’s, or Jason Sudeikis getting ‘tested’ for COVID-19, but I wouldn’t entirely blame them. Sometimes you need a live audience for these things to work. I guess that’s why comedians ‘opening’ for musicians or even other comedians is such a thing. Performers and presenters feed off of the energy of a crowd, and it’s a vibe that one can somehow feel even while watching from our homes. And I’m sure when presenting live, anyone, but especially the host, might leave the door open for a bit of improvisation based on how the material’s being received. In fact, the absence of an audible reaction from the audience seemed almost jarring to me, so it was not at all a bad effort on the host’s and presenters’ part to deliver what they did, even if all it did was illicit a few smiles.

Viewing party!
Yet, a remote audience lent its own charm to the proceedings. It was extremely endearing to see how the cast and creators and crew of various shows huddled in living rooms or hotel suites and so on, having their own ‘viewing parties’ while also playing a considerably active part in the virtual event. Award winners definitely responded more to the reactions of the people around them. Especially EUPHORIA’s Zendaya comes to mind. Her unrestrained reaction to not just being named ‘outstanding lead actress in a drama’, but also to the people cheering her on, was extremely adorable. Another one was SUCCESSION’s Jesse Armstrong, who made a mark with his acceptance speeches amidst his own ‘viewing party’ in London. He ‘un-thanked’ the corona virus and President Trump and Prime Minister Johnson, and other such ‘quasi-nationalist’ world leaders and media moguls (like the Murdochs who have loosely inspired his own show), who keep them in power. It became quite a talked-about acceptance speech, owing to his offbeat way of making a political statement.


Almost everyone did make a political statement though, especially urging America to vote. Mark Ruffalo made his point well, tying it in with the theme of his limited series I KNOW THIS MUCH IS TRUE—about showing up and ‘taking care’ of ‘our most vulnerable’ people. There was also SCHITT’S CREEK’s Daniel Levy, who did so in one of his million acceptance speeches, speaking about how their show was about the ‘transformational effects of love and acceptance’, and that voting was the only way America would have some love and acceptance. However, his best one was when he accepted the ‘supporting actor’ Emmy, wherein he thanked fellow Emmy winners, his dad Eugene Levy, and on-screen mom Catherine O’Hara. He thanked the two ‘brilliant comedic masterminds’ for giving him and others “The safety and security to do what we want and to try and to experiment and to grow.” And each time SCHITT’S CREEK won, we caught a glimpse of the cutest little viewing party of all! It was such a celebration there at that gathering in Canada, with the cast and others from SCHITT’S, cheering each other on and reveling in the overwhelming love that the Television Academy showed them.


Win-win!

SCHITT’S CREEK became the first series ever to win Emmys for all seven major categories in comedy (outstanding series, directing, writing, lead actress and actor, and supporting actress and actor), and the gem of a show deserved every win. I predicted it would be a clean sweep, and it was. Several other categories were quite predictable as well, but it was amazing that the brilliant SUCCESSION and the evocative WATCHMEN got their due, for outstanding drama and limited series obviously, but especially the Emmys for Jeremy Strong and Regina King. Zendaya’s win was a pleasant surprise, as she, 24, broke the record for the youngest ever to win lead actress drama, after it was broken just last year by KILLING EVE’s Jodie Comer, 26.


A more-than-satisfying set of results and a few very endearing moments, especially among the recipients, will leave me complaining about very little. It may not have been the most thrilling Emmys or the most engaging, but I will give the host and the team behind the scenes their due for putting together a nice show, that celebrated television. I think that’s particularly important during such times when it might feel like there isn’t all that much to celebrate. As Kimmel said in his opening monologue: “[Through the dark tunnel of the lockdown and quarantine, we’ve had one friend,] who’s there for us 24 hours a day—our old pal television… Through the good times and the breaking bads, television is there for you!”


Here’s a list of Emmy winners in the major categories:


DRAMA

Drama Series

BETTER CALL SAUL
THE CROWN
THE HANDMAID’S TALE
KILLING EVE
THE MANDALORIAN
OZARK
STRANGER THINGS
SUCCESSION
  

Lead Actress, Drama
Jennifer Aniston, THE MORNING SHOW
Olivia Colman, THE CROWN
Jodie Comer, KILLING EVE
Laura Linney, OZARK
Sandra Oh, KILLING EVE
Zendaya, EUPHORIA
 

Lead Actor, Drama
Jason Bateman, OZARK
Sterling K. Brown, THIS IS US
Steve Carell, THE MORNING SHOW
Brian Cox, SUCCESSION
Billy Porter, POSE
Jeremy Strong, SUCCESSION

Supporting Actress, Drama
Helena Bonham Carter, THE CROWN
Laura Dern, BIG LITTLE LIES
Julia Garner, OZARK
Thandie Newton, WESTWORLD
Fiona Shaw, KILLING EVE
Sarah Snook, SUCCESSION
Meryl Streep, BIG LITTLE LIES
Samira Wiley, THE HANDMAID’S TALE

Supporting Actor, Drama
Nicholas Braun, SUCCESSION
Billy Crudup, THE MORNING SHOW
Kieran Culkin, SUCCESSION
Mark Duplass, THE MORNING SHOW
Giancarlo Esposito, BETTER CALL SAUL
Matthew Macfadyen, SUCCESSION
Bradley Whitford, THE HANDMAID’S TALE
Jeffrey Wright, WESTWORLD
 

Directing For A Drama Series
THE CROWN (Episode: ‘Aberfan’), Directed by Benjamin Caron 
THE CROWN (Episode: ‘Cri de coeur’), Directed by Jessica Hobbs 
HOMELAND (Episode: ‘Prisoners of war’), Directed by Lesli Linka Glatter 
THE MORNING SHOW (Episode: ‘The interview"), Directed by Mimi Leder 
OZARK (Episode: ‘Fire pink’), Directed by Alik Sakharov
OZARK (Episode: ‘Su casa es mi casa’), Directed by Ben Semanoff 
SUCCESSION (Episode: ‘Hunting’), Directed by Andrij Parekh
SUCCESSION (Episode: ‘This is not for tears’), Directed by Mark Mylod

Writing For A Drama Series
BETTER CALL SAUL (Episode: ‘Bad choice road’), Written by Thomas Schnauz
BETTER CALL SAUL (Episode: ‘Bagman’), Written by Gordon Smith 
THE CROWN (Episode: ‘Aberfan’), Written by Peter Morgan 
OZARK (Episode: ‘All in’), Written by Chris Mundy 
OZARK (Episode: ‘Boss fight’), Written by John Shiban 
OZARK (Episode: ‘Fire pink’), Written by Miki Johnson 
SUCCESSION (Episode: ‘This is not for tears’), Written by Jesse Armstrong


COMEDY

Comedy Series
CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM
DEAD TO ME
THE GOOD PLACE
INSECURE
THE KOMINSKY METHOD
THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL
SCHITT’S CREEK
WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS

Lead Actress, Comedy
Christina Applegate, DEAD TO ME
Rachel Brosnahan, THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL
Linda Cardellini, DEAD TO ME
Catherine O’Hara, SCHITT’S CREEK
Issa Rae, INSECURE
Tracee Ellis Ross, BLACK-ISH

Lead Actor, Comedy
Anthony Anderson, BLACK-ISH
Don Cheadle, BLACK MONDAY
Ted Danson, THE GOOD PLACE
Michael Douglas, THE KOMINSKY METHOD
Eugene Levy, SCHITT’S CREEK
Ramy Youssef, RAMY

Supporting Actress, Comedy
Alex Borstein, THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL
D’Arcy Carden, THE GOOD PLACE
Betty Gilpin, GLOW
Marin Hinkle, THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL
Kate McKinnon, SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
Annie Murphy, SCHITT’S CREEK
Yvonne Orji, INSECURE
Cecily Strong, SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE

Supporting Actor, Comedy
Mahershala Ali, RAMY
Alan Arkin, THE KOMINSKY METHOD
Andre Braugher, BROOKLYN NINE-NINE
Sterling K. Brown, THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL
William Jackson Harper, THE GOOD PLACE
Daniel Levy, SCHITT’S CREEK
Tony Shalhoub, THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL
Kenan Thompson, SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE

Outstanding Directing For A Comedy Series
THE GREAT (Episode: ‘The great’), Directed by Matt Shakman 
THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL (Episode: ‘It's comedy or cabbage’), Directed by Amy Sherman-Palladino
THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL (Episode: ‘Marvelous radio’), Directed by Daniel Palladino 
MODERN FAMILY (Episode: ‘Finale, part 2’), Directed by Gail Mancuso 
RAMY (Episode: ‘Miakhalifa.mov’), Directed by Ramy Youssef 
SCHITT'S CREEK (Episode: ‘Happy ending’), Directed by Andrew Cividino and Dan Levy
WILL & GRACE (Episode: ‘We love Lucy’), Directed by James Burrows

Like I said before, this is SCHITT’s year. They’re winning this for their excellent finale, which was equal parts funny and emotional, in execution and tone, without being too indulgent or unnecessarily mushy.

Outstanding Writing For A Comedy Series
THE GOOD PLACE (Episode: ‘Whenever you're ready’), Written by Michael Schur (NBC)
THE GREAT (Episode: ‘The great’), Written by Tony McNamara (Hulu)
SCHITT'S CREEK (Episode: ‘Happy ending’), Written by Dan Levy (Pop TV)
SCHITT'S CREEK (Episode: ‘The presidential suite’), Written by David West Read (Pop TV)
WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS (Episode: ‘Collaboration’), Written by Sam Johnson and Chris Marcil (FX)
WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS (Episode: ‘Ghosts’), Written by Paul Simms (FX)
WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS (Episode: ‘On the run’), Written by Stefani Robinson (FX)


LIMITED SERIES AND TV MOVIE

Limited Series
LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE

MRS. AMERICA
UNBELIEVABLE
UNORTHODOX
WATCHMEN

TV Movie
American Son
Bad Education
Dolly Parton’s Heartstrings: These Old Bones
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: Kimmy vs. the Reverend
 

Lead Actress, Limited Series Or TV Movie
Cate Blanchett, MRS. AMERICA
Shira Haas, UNORTHODOX
Regina King, WATCHMEN
Octavia Spencer, Self Made
Kerry Washington, LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE

Lead Actor, Limited Series Or TV Movie
Jeremy Irons, WATCHMEN
Hugh Jackman, Bad Education
Paul Mescal, NORMAL PEOPLE
Jeremy Pope, HOLLYWOOD
Mark Ruffalo, I KNOW THIS MUCH IS TRUE

Supporting Actress, Limited Series Or TV Movie
Uzo Aduba, MRS. AMERICA
Toni Collette, UNBELIEVABLE
Margo Martindale, MRS. AMERICA
Jean Smart, WATCHMEN
Holland Taylor, HOLLYWOOD
Tracey Ullman, MRS. AMERICA

Supporting Actor, Limited Series Or TV Movie
Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, WATCHMEN
Jovan Adepo, WATCHMEN
Tituss Burgess, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: Kimmy vs. the Reverend
Louis Gossett Jr., WATCHMEN
Dylan McDermott, HOLLYWOOD
Jim Parsons, HOLLYWOOD

Outstanding Directing For A Limited Series, Movie, Or Dramatic Special
LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE (Episode: ‘Find a way’), Directed by Lynn Shelton
NORMAL PEOPLE (Episode: ‘Episode 5’), Directed by Lenny Abrahamson
UNORTHODOX, Directed by Maria Schrader
WATCHMEN (Episode: ‘It's summer and we're running out of ice’), Directed by Nicole Kassell 
WATCHMEN (Episode: ‘Little fear of lightning’), Directed by Steph Green 
WATCHMEN (Episode: ‘This extraordinary being’), Directed by Stephen Williams
 

Outstanding Writing For A Limited Series, Movie, Or Dramatic Special
MRS. AMERICA (Episode: ‘Shirley’), Written by Tanya Barfield 
NORMAL PEOPLE (Episode: ‘Episode 3’), Written by Sally Rooney and Alice Birch 
UNBELIEVABLE (Episode: ‘Episode 1’), Written by Susannah Grant, Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman
UNORTHODOX (Episode: ‘Part 1’), Written by Anna Winger 
WATCHMEN (Episode: ‘This extraordinary being’), Written by Damon Lindelof and Cord Jefferson