Monday, January 11, 2016

HITS AND MISSES OF THE 2016 GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS

As usual, some presentations fell flat, and the hosting wasn’t entertaining throughout, but this year’s show had quite a few surprises in store for us.


They call it the drunken Oscars, and when Ricky Gervais takes the stage with a glass of beer, you can see exactly why. The crux of his opening was that the Golden Globes aren’t a big deal, which he found many ways to reiterate and go on about throughout the show. It was funny initially, as it reflected his ‘I don’t give a shit’ attitude, and as someone who’s essentially a representative of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, there was a kind of self-deprecating quality that made it particularly amusing, but the theme got old and fast. For a moment after his opening, I felt that this might make the first recipient a little conscious about making a big deal about winning, which might make them hold back a little, but Kate Winslet is too classy and professional to carry forward or even acknowledge any disrespect towards the HFPA when she’s being honored by them. So she went on to give an acceptance speech that reflected how she felt about winning, regardless of the tone Gervais had set.

There were other things though that Gervais tackled well. His mention of Jennifer Lawrence voicing her thoughts on equal pay led to some politically incorrect humor about him getting paid as much as Tina Fey and Amy Poehler collectively got paid for the same job the previous year. That might have ticked off many, but I thought it was funny, and need not have been taken too seriously. His jokes about Mel Gibson, however, weren’t all that funny and seemed quite unnecessary, even if his deliberately taking away the glass of beer from in front of Gibson did make me smile a little. His introduction of Eddie Redmayne as a presenter was mildly amusing, but only if you perceived it as complimenting Redmayne’s performance as a transgender woman in The Danish Girl.  

The presentations weren’t very indulgent this time, and largely stuck to the point, but a few of them did shine. I particularly enjoyed Eva Longoria and America Ferrara’s, which poked fun at racism and seemed spot-on. I also thought Jamie Foxx referencing Steve Harvey’s blunder when announcing this year’s Miss Universe was hilarious. He even quoted Harvey. “It’s on the card. I take full responsibility,” he said. There were a few presentations that were quite off, such as Mark Wahlberg and Will Ferrell’s, with them trying too hard to be funny, wearing those dumb ‘2016’ party prop sunglasses. Almost as silly was Andy Samberg pretending to have prepared to present the final award of the evening. Jim Carrey talking about being a two-time Golden Globe winner wasn’t as bad, but it was stretched too long.

Among the acceptance speeches, I genuinely thought that Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet and Jennifer Lawrence had the finest of the lot. It was quite admirable how Leo found a way to talk about issues close to his heart in the context of the film he’d won for. And Lawrence’s gratitude towards David O. Russell was nicely expressed,

The results in general were quite surprising. I managed to predict only nine out of the twenty-five categories correctly, but I also stated that the Globes had become quite unpredictable lately. The biggest surprises for me were:

1. The Revenant winning best picture, drama, was quite unexpected. I must admit I haven’t seen the film yet, but I didn’t consider it a frontrunner. I really thought that it would be between Mad Max: Fury Road and Spotlight this year.

2. Jon Hamm’s win for MAD MEN. I thought especially since he’d won before, they wouldn’t bother giving it to him again, since MAD MEN was completely left out of the race for best drama series.

3. Maura Tierney’s win for THE AFFAIR was well deserved, but surprising, since the HFPA largely forgot about their last year’s best drama series when shortlisting down to the rest of the nominations this year.

4. MOZART IN THE JUNGLE winning two big awards. It essentially became the BROOKLYN NINE-NINE or TRANSPARENT of 2016. It was not even among the top three frontrunners for best comedy series.

5. The Martian winning best picture, comedy, was surprising indeed. Not because it hardly seemed like a comedy. Remember when The Kids Are All Right won in the same category? That was quite an intense drama, which the HFPA called a comedy, so for The Martian to be categorized as comedy wasn’t all that unusual after that. Its win wasn’t a surprise because it didn’t deserve to win either, because it did. It was a good film. However, I really thought The Big Short would be this year's frontrunner. I was half expecting the HFPA to repeat what they did with The Hangover, giving the Globe to an out-and-out comedy such as Spy this year, but I wasn't surprised that that's not how things turned out. 

6. Steve Jobs winning the Globe for best screenplay was definitely a surprise. Firstly, because it wasn’t as good as Aaron Sorkin’s work usually is. And secondly, this was the other category that I thought The Big Short would shine in.

7. Sylvester Stallone winning for Creed was quite unexpected. I think it was just to extend some kind of courtesy to the veteran.

One thing’s for sure. Things could look a lot differently than one might have imagined, when the Oscars roll out next month. Frontrunners are changing quickly. While the SAG Awards on January 30 could shed some light on what might happen at the Dolby Theater, only after this Thursday’s Oscar nominations announcement will we know for sure if this year’s Golden Globe winning films will even be contenders.


Here’s a complete list of all the winners. (**These were my predictions.)

Best Television Series – Drama
EMPIRE (Fox)
GAME OF THRONES (HBO)
MR. ROBOT (USA)**
NARCOS (Netflix)
OUTLANDER (Starz)

Best Television Series – Comedy or Musical
CASUAL (Hulu)
MOZART IN THE JUNGLE (Amazon)
ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK (Netflix)
SILICON VALLEY (HBO)
TRANSPARENT (Amazon)
VEEP (HBO)**

Best Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
AMERICAN CRIME (ABC)
AMERICAN HORROR STORY: HOTEL (FX)
FARGO (FX)**
FLESH AND BONE (Starz)
WOLF HALL (BBC)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television
Kirsten Dunst, FARGO**
Lady Gaga, AMERICA HORROR STORY: HOTEL
Sarah Hay, FLESH AND BONE
Felicity Huffman, AMERICAN CRIME
Queen Latifah, BESSIE

Best Performance by an Actor in a Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television
Idris Elba, LUTHER
Oscar Isaac, SHOW ME A HERO
David Oyelowo, NIGHTINGALE**
Mark Rylance, WOLF HALL
Patrick Wilson, FARGO

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series - Drama
Caitriona Balfe, OUTLANDER
Viola Davis, HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER
Eva Green, PENNY DREADFUL
Taraji P. Henson, EMPIRE**
Robin Wright, HOUSE OF CARDS

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series - Drama
Jon Hamm, MAD MEN
Rami Malek, MR. ROBOT**
Wagner Moura, NARCOS
Bob Odenkirk, BETTER CALL SAUL
Liev Schreiber, RAY DONOVAN

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series - Comedy or Musical
Rachel Bloom, CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND**
Jamie Lee Curtis, SCREAM QUEENS
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, VEEP
Gina Rodriguez, JANE THE VIRGIN
Lily Tomlin, GRACE AND FRANKIE

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series - Comedy or Musical
Aziz Ansari, MASTER OF NONE**
Gael Garcia Bernal, MOZART IN THE JUNGLE
Rob Lowe, THE GRINDER
Patrick Stewart, BLUNT TALK
Jeffrey Tambor, TRANSPARENT

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television
Uzo Aduba, ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK**
Joanne Froggatt, DOWNTON ABBEY
Regina King, AMERICAN CRIME
Judith Light, TRANSPARENT
Maura Tierney, THE AFFAIR

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television
Alan Cumming, THE GOOD WIFE
Damian Lewis, WOLF HALL
Ben Mendelsohn, BLOODLINE**
Tobias Menzies, OUTLANDER
Christian Slater, MR. ROBOT

Best Motion Picture - Drama
Carol
Mad Max: Fury Road**
The Revenant
Room
Spotlight

Best Motion Picture - Comedy or Musical
The Big Short**
Joy
The Martian
Spy
Trainwreck

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture - Drama
Cate Blanchett, Carol**
Brie Larson, Room
Rooney Mara, Carol
Saoirse Ronan, Brooklyn
Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama
Bryan Cranston, Trumbo
Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant**
Michael Fassbender, Steve Jobs
Eddie Redmayne, The Danish Girl
Will Smith, Concussion

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture - Comedy or Musical
Jennifer Lawrence, Joy**
Melissa McCarthy, Spy
Amy Schumer, Trainwreck
Maggie Smith, The Lady in the Van
Lily Tomlin, Grandma

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - Comedy or Musical
Christian Bale, The Big Short
Steve Carell, The Big Short
Matt Damon, The Martian**
Al Pacino, Danny Collins
Mark Ruffalo, Infinitely Polar Bear

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture
Jane Fonda, Youth
Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight
Helen Mirren, Trumbo
Alicia Vikander, Ex Machina
Kate Winslet, Steve Jobs**

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture
Paul Dano, Love & Mercy
Idris Elba, Beasts of No Nation**
Mark Rylance, Bridge of Spies
Michael Shannon, 99 Homes
Sylvester Stallone, Creed

Best Director - Motion Picture
Todd Haynes, Carol
Alejandro G. Inarritu, The Revenant
Tom McCarthy, Spotlight
George Miller, Mad Max: Fury Road**
Ridley Scott, The Martian

Best Screenplay - Motion Picture
Emma Donoghue, Room
Tom McCarthy, Josh Singer, Spotlight
Charles Randolph, Adam McKay, The Big Short**
Aaron Sorkin, Steve Jobs
Quentin Tarantino, The Hateful Eight

Best Animated Feature Film
Anomalisa
The Good Dinosaur
Inside Out**
The Peanuts Movie
Shaun the Sheep Movie

Best Foreign-Language Film
The Brand New Testament (Belgium/France/Luxembourg)
The Club (Chile)
The Fencer (Finland/Germany/Estonia)
Mustang (France)
Son of Saul (Hungary)**

Best Original Score - Motion Picture
Carter Burwell, Carol
Alexandre Desplat, The Danish Girl**
Ennio Morricone, The Hateful Eight
Daniel Pemberton, Steve Jobs
Ryuichi Sakamoto, Alva Noto, The Revenant

Best Original Song - Motion Picture
"Love me Like You Do" – Fifty Shades of Grey, written by Max Martin, Savan Kotecha, Ali Payami, Ilya Salmanzadeh
"One Kind of Love" – Love & Mercy, written by Brian Wilson, Scott Bennett
"See You Again" – Furious 7, written by Justin Franks, Andrew Cedar, Charlie Puth, Cameron Thomaz**
"Simple Song #3" – Youth, written by David Lang
"Writing’s on the Wall" – Spectre, written by Sam Smith, Jimmy Napes

No comments:

Post a Comment