Thursday, July 14, 2016

THE TV TALK BEST OF 2015-16 – NOMINEES

Series – Drama
THE AFFAIR
BETTER CALL SAUL
DOWNTON ABBEY
FARGO
HOMELAND
MASTERS OF SEX
NARCOS

Series – Comedy
CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND
GRACE & FRANKIE
MASTER OF NONE
MODERN FAMILY
MOM
MOZART IN THE JUNGLE
VEEP

Performance By An Actress In A Leading Role – Drama
Felicity Huffman as Leslie Graham, AMERICAN CRIME
Keri Russell as Elizabeth Jennings, THE AMERICANS
Michelle Dockery as Lady Mary Crawley, DOWNTON ABBEY
Julianna Margulies as Alicia Florrick, THE GOOD WIFE
Claire Danes as Carrie Matthison, HOMELAND
Viola Davis as Annalise Keating, HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER

Performance By An Actor In A Leading Role – Drama
Freddie Highmore as Norman Bates, BATES MOTEL
Bob Odenkirk, as Jimmy McGill, BETTER CALL SAUL
Kevin Spacey as Frank Underwood, HOUSE OF CARDS
Michael Sheen as William Masters, MASTERS OF SEX
Wagner Moura as Pablo Escobar, NARCOS
Rami Malek as Elliot Alderson, MR. ROBOT

Performance By An Actress In A Leading Role – Comedy
Rachel Bloom as Rebecca Bunch, CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND
Lily Tomlin as Frankie Bergstein, GRACE & FRANKIE
Jane Fonda as Grace Hanson, GRACE & FRANKIE
Melissa McCarthy as Molly Flynn, MIKE & MOLLY
Anna Faris as Christy, MOM
Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Selina Meyer, VEEP

Performance By An Actor In A Leading Role – Comedy
Jim Parsons as Dr. Sheldon Cooper, THE BIG BANG THEORY
Rob Lowe as Dean Sanderson, THE GRINDER
Aziz Ansari as Dev, MASTER OF NONE
Gael Garcia Bernal as Rodrigo D’souza, MOZART IN THE JUNGLE
Jeffrey Tambor as Maura Pfefferman, TRANSPARENT

Performance By An Actress In A Supporting Role – Drama
Maura Tierney as Helen Solloway, THE AFFAIR
Regina King as Terri LaCroix, AMERICAN CRIME
Lili Taylor, as Anne Blaine, AMERICAN CRIME
Maggie Smith as Lady Violet Crawley, DOWNTON ABBEY
Kirsten Dunst as Peggy Blumquist, FARGO
Sarah Paulson as Marcia Clark, THE PEOPLE V. O.J. – AMERICAN CRIME STORY

Performance By An Actor In A Supporting Role – Drama
Jonathan Banks as Mike Ehrmantraut, BETTER CALL SAUL
Jim Carter as Charles Carson, DOWNTON ABBEY
Rob James Collier as Thomas Barrow, DOWNTON ABBEY
Rupert Friend as Peter Quinn, HOMELAND
Cuba Gooding Jr. as O.J. Simpson, THE PEOPLE V. O.J. – AMERICAN CRIME STORY
Christian Slater as Mr. Robot, MR. ROBOT

Performance By An Actress In A Supporting Role – Comedy
Mayim Bialik as Dr. Amy Farrah Fowler, THE BIG BANG THEORY
Donna Lynne Champlin as Paula Proctor, CARZY EX-GIRLFRIEND
Allison Janney as Bonnie, MOM
Debra Monk as Betty, MOZART IN THE JUNGLE
Suzanne Cryer as Laurie Bream, SILICON VALLEY
Judith Light as Shelly Pfefferman, TRANSPARENT

Performance By An Actor In A Supporting Role – Comedy
Fred Savage as Stewart Sanderson, THE GRINDER
Ed O'Neill as Jay Pritchett, MODERN FAMILY
Eric Stonestreet as Cameron Tucker, MODERN FAMILY
Malcolm McDowell as Thomas, MOZART IN THE JUNGLE
Zach Woods as Donald ‘Jared’ Dunn, SILICON VALLEY
Tony Hale as Gary Walsh, VEEP

Performance By A Guest Actress
Christine Baranski as Dr. Beverly Hofstadter, THE BIG BANG THEORY
June Squibb as ‘Meemaw’, THE BIG BANG THEORY
Marisa Tomei as Mimi Whiteman, EMPIRE
Catherine O'Hara as Dr. Debra Radcliffe, MODERN FAMILY
Rosie O'Donnell as Jeanine, MOM
Ellen Burstyn as Elizabeth Hale, HOUSE OF CARDS

Performance By A Guest Actor
Michael J. Fox as Louis Canning, THE GOOD WIFE
Timothy Olyphant as Timothy Olyphant, THE GRINDER
Reg E. Cathey Freddy, HOUSE OF CARDS
Harry Hamlin as Fred, MOM
Zachary Levi as James McMahon, TELENOVELA

Writing
BETTER CALL SAUL
DOWNTON ABBEY
FARGO
HOMELAND
MASTERS OF SEX
MODERN FAMILY
MOM

Cinematography
BETTER CALL SAUL
FARGO
HOMELAND
MR. ROBOT
THE PEOPLE V. O.J. – AMERICAN CRIME STORY

Production Design
BETTER CALL SAUL
CODE BLACK
FARGO
HOMELAND
SUPERGIRL

Costume Design
DOWNTON ABBEY
EMPIRE
FARGO
THE ROYALS

Make-Up And Hairstyling – Prosthetic/Non-Prosthetic
CODE BLACK
FARGO
GREY’S ANATOMY
NARCOS

Music – Background Score
THE CATCH
THE GOOD WIFE
HOMELAND
MR. ROBOT

Music – Songs (Original/Compilation)
THE CATCH
CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND
EMPIRE
GREY'S ANATOMY
NASHVILLE 


Fine Print ▪ The eligible series are those that I follow, and have had new episodes on the air or online between September 12, 2015 and July 14, 2016 (THE AFFAIR, AMERICAN CRIME, AMERICAN IDOL, THE AMERICANS, BATES MOTEL, BETTER CALL SAUL, THE BIG BANG THEORY, BLUE BLOODS, BONES, CHICAGO FIRE, CHICAGO MED, CHICAGO P.D., CODE BLACK, CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND, DEVIOUS MAIDS, DOWNTON ABBEY, DR. KEN, ELEMENTARY, EMPIRE, EPISODES, FARGO, FEED THE BEAST, THE FLASH, THE FOSTERS, FULLER HOUSE, GIRLS, THE GOLDBERGS, THE GOOD WIFE, GOTHAM, GRACE AND FRANKIE, GREY'S ANATOMY, HOMELAND, HOUSE OF CARDS, HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER, MASTER OF NONE, MASTERCHEF AUSTRALIA, MASTERS OF SEX, MISTRESSES, MODERN FAMILY, MOM, MOZART IN THE JUNGLE, MR. ROBOT, NARCOS, NASHVILLE, THE ODD COUPLE, THE ORIGINALS, THE PEOPLE V. O.J. – AMERICAN CRIME STORY, QUANTICO, RIZZOLI AND ISLES, THE ROYALS, SCANDAL, SHERLOCK, SILICON VALLEY, SUPERGIRL, SUPERSTORE, TELENOVELA, TRANSPARENT, THE VAMPIRE DIARIES, VEEP) ▪ The maximum number of nominees 7 ▪ The minimum number of nominees is 3 ▪ The ‘TV TALK Best Of 2015-16’ is only an expression of what I considered as excellence in television in the year 2015-16 ▪

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

'THE GOOD WIFE' FINALE: A GOOD WIFE NO MORE

It was what held her back, but it's also what made Alicia Florrrick the person that we saw her become. As Alicia finally broke away from being the titular 'good wife', here's what I thought of how the show ended


[Spoiler Alert! For those who haven't seen seen the finale yet]


Photos, courtesy: CBS Television Studios
If there’s one thing we’ve realized over seven seasons of THE GOOD WIFE, it’s that nothing is impossible. Even when there seemed to be nothing in sight for the show to keep a series- or season-long story arc going, something unexpected would show up. And that’s never been done in a manner to purely shock-and-awe. The understated treatment of drama in this series, infused with humor in the most originally quirky manner, is what made it unique. And while that was something we could rest assured we would get from the series finale, what many probably weren’t expecting was that the series would end just like it began—with someone getting slapped in a service corridor.

Now the showrunners, Robert and Michelle King, have said that they wanted to end the show with aslap, the way it began, when Alicia slapped Peter after the press conference through which he announced that he was resigning as Cook County State’s Attorney. This time, it was after Peter announced that he was resigning as Governor of Illinois. Now did that slap have to be landed on Alicia? Maybe it did. Maybe it was somewhat poetic. But did it have to come from Diane? It definitely reinforced a strong parallel that ran through all the ways in which things ended up for Alicia. Diane’s reaction, to Alicia making Lucca badger Kurt in court, indicated that they were done, even if it might have been temporary. However, was that reaction worthy of being the one that closes the show? I don’t think so. If there had to be a slap, it should’ve come from someone who Alicia considered close, someone who felt truly betrayed by Alicia, the way Alicia had felt betrayed and humiliated by Peter in the beginning. Yes, that might have been difficult, given how the relationships had progressed, and the final character arcs that we saw, but given what the Kings were going for, they could’ve made it happen in a more natural way. If the idea was to show Alicia’s change from victim to victimizer, I think they might have fallen short of that.

Before I saw the video in which the Kings talked about their idea of the ending, I saw the finale as being closer to something that I had already imagined it to be. I had imagined that Alicia would finally break away from being the good wife, and go off somewhere to start a new life absolutely alone. In that, I wasn’t completely disappointed to see her end up alone—without a husband or a lover, her kids off to college, her partner abandoning her, her friend, Cary, having left her side…It was all fine by me, except for how she ended up there. Now I wasn’t expecting THE GOOD WIFE to end with everything resolved and loose ends tied up in pretty bows. I wouldn’t even want it to end like that. But at the very least, I expected some closure between Alicia and Cary, and between Alicia and Diane. They didn’t have to end up living happily ever after as business partners or friends, but Alicia and Diane could’ve parted ways agreeing to disagree. And I certainly think that Alicia and Cary’s friendship, which was one of the best platonic relationships on TV, was left to wither without any care from the writers. It was almost like they didn’t even want that friendship to die a graceful death. One scene, even an open-ended exchange was all that was required to even hint that they were willing to let go and part ways without any bad blood. Even Alicia's friendship with Kalinda was scarred, and they weren't the best of friends when Kalinda left, but their parting was so graceful. I wish Cary and Alicia would have had at least that.

And then there was Jason, whom I did not like very much, frankly. However, I understand that Alicia’s willingness to have a little fun and live for herself a little was the reason why his character existed. In fact, I’d even go so far as to say that maybe Jason was a figment of Alicia’s imagination all along—a way for her to escape, break free from all the pressure that she’d put on herself since Will’s death. She did break down in front of Peter back then, but pulled herself back together soon after. However, Eli’s recent confession, of having deleted Will’s voicemail, led Alicia down a spiral, which was beautifully portrayed, and saw her breaking loose, with that gut-wrenching meltdown in front of Lucca in the laundry room. I saw her as trying to be there for herself, being impulsive, and Jason’s character was only there to support that. The only thing that stood in her way was Peter’s legal trouble, and her own inhibitions. She had made her decision about not letting the former stop her from being the person that she wanted to be. She had decided that she was done being the good wife after being there for Peter this one last time. And that was good character growth. To add to that was her final internal conflict, which we saw through her conversations with Will. It was only back when Will was still around was she even willing to think of having a life other than the one she was living. And she needed to let go of the idea of Will being the only possible escape that she had. It was nicely written, and adequately nuanced. Of course, it was a pleasant surprise and a sheer treat to see Alicia and Will together again, even if it was all just in her head.

And finally, Jason was only there to vanish into thin air. His job was done. He had to help her break free, which he had. Anything more than that—to see Alicia and Jason ending up together as an actual couple—would have just been absurd. Meanwhile, Alicia’s fate at the firm remained a question mark. Would she go all out in embracing a new self, and actually start a new life on her own somewhere, as I’d imagined? Perhaps she would. But even if she were to not do anything that drastic, and continue down a path that might have led to a career in politics, we know that she would have a future, as Eli suggested. After Peter dropped out of the presidential race, Ruth telling Eli that he had his eye on the wrong Florrick had to go somewhere, and I’m glad that it made Eli invest himself in Alicia’s political future. Alicia’s rise, independent of her husband, and as her own person, would definitely be excellent to watch. It’s a direction that I, and I suspect others also, were absolutely certain this show would take, and it’s sad that we won’t see that happen. But that’s only one of the many things that make me sad about the end of this outstanding series. 



Sunday, February 28, 2016

OSCARS 2016: LEO WON, ‘SPOTLIGHT’ WON, AND DIVERSITY CONVERSATION DOMINATED

Photos, courtesy: AMPAS
Leonardo DiCaprio accepts his award for The Revenant from Julianne Moore
‘Oscar winner Leonardo DiCaprio’…it feels really good to say that. And I was glad that he didn’t take “tonight for granted.” For me, the moments leading up to Julianne Moore’s presentation for best actor were as tense as the scene in which the bear mauled Leo in The Revenant. Up until then, I was calm. Even though Leo’s and Brie’s Oscar wins seemed to be the most predictable, if some of the other results announced up until then were anything to go by, anything could’ve happened with even best actor and actress.

THE BIGGEST SURPRISES
Among the biggest surprises of the night, for me, were Ex Machina winning for visual effects, in the face of all these epic movies that would’ve been impossible without the great visual effects they had. I was happy though. Ex Machina at least deserved that. Strangely, despite Mad Max: Fury Road sweeping as many as six Oscars, there was still a good mix of wining films.

Room, The Hateful Eight, The Big Short, The Danish Girl and Bridge Of Spies all managed to win at least one Oscar. In fact, Mark Rylance’s win for Bridge Of Spies was one of the unexpected results. Yes, he did win a BAFTA, but at the Oscars, I think everyone was sure that Sylvester Stallone would win.

But the biggest surprise was Spotlight winning best picture. It’s not like it didn’t deserve it, but a majority of people had their money on The Revenant. Many were even sure that Mad Max: Fury Road would take away the big prize, in addition to several other awards. The fact that neither The Revenant nor Mad Max: Fury Road were nominated for screenplay awards should’ve offered us a clue. If the Academy didn’t think they were among the year’s best-written films, they probably wouldn’t think of either as the year’s best motion picture either.

Speaking of screenplay, it was strange that they started the evening with Oscars for screenplay, since up until this year, it’s almost like tradition to start with one of the supporting acting

Oscars. Another big surprise was “Writing’s On The Wall” winning best original song, especially after the strength and social relevance of “Til It Happens To You” was brought out by Lady Gaga’s powerful and moving performance. On the other hand, Sam Smith’s performance was quite terrible. Maybe he was having an off day, but his live performance was really screechy and maybe even off-tune in parts—nothing like the recorded song.


THE SHOW
How much is too much talk about a socially relevant topic that caused controversy. I think the best answer to that was this year’s Oscars. Yes, they had to address the #OscarsSoWhite controversy, and given how the Academy hasn’t ignored it since the conversation started after the nominations were announced last month, we were all quite certain that they would even make a joke or two about it. But making the Oscars all about the diversity, ironically, made the show the opposite of diverse.

From host Chris Rock’s monologue and Kevin Hart’s moment on stage, to Academy president, Cheryl Boone Isaacs’ speech, and Sacha Baron Cohen’s presentation, it was all just too much. Yes, a few jokes on things like child labor in Asia were made, in poor taste even, but it was all just overpowered by talk about diversity.

Even if I have to ignore the lack of diversity in the material of the hosting, the presentations, etc, the jokes weren’t all that funny, except for maybe Chris Rock’s reference to Rihanna. “Jada [Pinkett-Smith] boycotting the Oscars is like me boycotting Rihanna’s panties. I wasn’t invited!” he said.

Rock did try something cute, with the scout girl cookies stunt—probably trying to create a moment like Ellen Degeneres’ pizza or selfie moment—but it wasn’t as effective as he maybe expected it to turn out.

Other elements of the Oscars viewing experience were thankfully up to the mark. From the opening montage and the orchestra’s performance to the set design and the presentation props (for costume and production design especially), everything was done with perfection. I even enjoyed the arrangements of Lady Gaga’s and The Weeknd’s performances.


THE ACCEPTANCE SPEECHES
Even Alejandro Iñárritu’s speech brought up the diversity issues. Although I liked the direction in which he took it, talking about working towards taking the world to a time when color of skin will become as irrelevant as the length of one’s hair. Among other good speeches was Mark Rylance’s.

It was refreshing to see others talk about other relevant topics. Vice President Joe Biden about sexual abuse, Sam Smith about the LGBT community, and of course, Leonardo DiCaprio taking the opportunity to talk about climate change—an issue that he is famously and passionately concerned about.

DiCaprio’s speech was also my favorite of the evening. I liked how he found a way to make his speech about The Revenant, but also making it about his career in a way that he knew that this win was long overdue. From thanking Martin Scorsese for teaching him so much about the cinematic art form, to his parents, and friends.


And that concludes another award season. Scroll down to see all the winners. (**these were my predictions)

Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate WInslet on the red carpet

These were the best red carpet looks; (left to right) Saoirse Ronan in Calvin Klein Collection, Cate Blanchett in Armani Privé, Jennifer Garner in Atelier Versace, Naomi Watts in Armani Privé, and Julianne Moore in Chanel Haute Couture
Best motion picture of the year
“The Big Short” Brad Pitt, Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner, Producers
“Bridge of Spies” Steven Spielberg, Marc Platt and Kristie Macosko Krieger, Producers
“Brooklyn” Finola Dwyer and Amanda Posey, Producers
“Mad Max: Fury Road” Doug Mitchell and George Miller, Producers
“The Martian” Simon Kinberg, Ridley Scott, Michael Schaefer and Mark Huffam, Producers
“The Revenant” Arnon Milchan, Steve Golin, Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Mary Parent and Keith Redmon, Producers**
“Room” Ed Guiney, Producer
“Spotlight” Michael Sugar, Steve Golin, Nicole Rocklin and Blye Pagon Faust, Producers

Performance by an actor in a leading role
Bryan Cranston in “Trumbo”
Matt Damon in “The Martian”
Leonardo DiCaprio in “The Revenant”**
Michael Fassbender in “Steve Jobs”
Eddie Redmayne in “The Danish Girl”

Performance by an actress in a leading role
Cate Blanchett in “Carol”
Brie Larson in “Room”**
Jennifer Lawrence in “Joy”
Charlotte Rampling in “45 Years”
Saoirse Ronan in “Brooklyn”


Achievement in directing
“The Big Short” Adam McKay
“Mad Max: Fury Road” George Miller
“The Revenant” Alejandro G. Iñárritu**
“Room” Lenny Abrahamson
“Spotlight” Tom McCarthy

Performance by an actor in a supporting role

Christian Bale in “The Big Short”
Tom Hardy in “The Revenant”
Mark Ruffalo in “Spotlight”
Mark Rylance in “Bridge of Spies”
Sylvester Stallone in “Creed”**

Performance by an actress in a supporting role

Jennifer Jason Leigh in “The Hateful Eight”
Rooney Mara in “Carol”
Rachel McAdams in “Spotlight”
Alicia Vikander in “The Danish Girl”**
Kate Winslet in “Steve Jobs”

Adapted screenplay
“The Big Short” Screenplay by Charles Randolph and Adam McKay
“Brooklyn” Screenplay by Nick Hornby
“Carol” Screenplay by Phyllis Nagy
“The Martian” Screenplay by Drew Goddard
“Room” Screenplay by Emma Donoghue**

This one’s a little unpredictable. The general odds seem to be largely in The Big Short’s favor, but I think the Academy will surprise many and give it to Room, which really is the film that deserves this win.

Original screenplay

“Bridge of Spies” Written by Matt Charman and Ethan Coen & Joel Coen
“Ex Machina” Written by Alex Garland
“Inside Out” Screenplay by Pete Docter, Meg LeFauve, Josh Cooley; Original story by Pete Docter, Ronnie del Carmen
“Spotlight” Written by Josh Singer & Tom McCarthy**
“Straight Outta Compton” Screenplay by Jonathan Herman and Andrea Berloff; Story by S. Leigh Savidge & Alan Wenkus and Andrea Berloff

Spotlight probably comes after The Revenant in the odds for the race for best picture, but it won’t win. Instead, the Academy will give it an Oscar for screenplay.

Best animated feature film of the year
“Anomalisa” Charlie Kaufman, Duke Johnson and Rosa Tran
“Boy and the World” Alê Abreu
“Inside Out” Pete Docter and Jonas Rivera**
“Shaun the Sheep Movie” Mark Burton and Richard Starzak
“When Marnie Was There” Hiromasa Yonebayashi and Yoshiaki Nishimura

Anomalisa winning this one is possible, but it would be a shocker, since everyone thinks Inside Out is winning this time.

Achievement in production design
“Bridge of Spies” Production Design: Adam Stockhausen; Set Decoration: Rena DeAngelo and Bernhard Henrich
“The Danish Girl” Production Design: Eve Stewart; Set Decoration: Michael Standish
“Mad Max: Fury Road” Production Design: Colin Gibson; Set Decoration: Lisa Thompson**
“The Martian” Production Design: Arthur Max; Set Decoration: Celia Bobak
“The Revenant” Production Design: Jack Fisk; Set Decoration: Hamish Purdy

Achievement in cinematography

“Carol” Ed Lachman
“The Hateful Eight” Robert Richardson
“Mad Max: Fury Road” John Seale
“The Revenant” Emmanuel Lubezki**
“Sicario” Roger Deakins

Achievement in visual effects
“Ex Machina” Andrew Whitehurst, Paul Norris, Mark Ardington and Sara Bennett
“Mad Max: Fury Road” Andrew Jackson, Tom Wood, Dan Oliver and Andy Williams
“The Martian” Richard Stammers, Anders Langlands, Chris Lawrence and Steven Warner
“The Revenant” Rich McBride, Matthew Shumway, Jason Smith and Cameron Waldbauer
“Star Wars: The Force Awakens” Roger Guyett, Patrick Tubach, Neal Scanlan and Chris Corbould**

Achievement in film editing
“The Big Short” Hank Corwin
“Mad Max: Fury Road” Margaret Sixel**
“The Revenant” Stephen Mirrione
“Spotlight” Tom McArdle
“Star Wars: The Force Awakens” Maryann Brandon and Mary Jo Markey

Achievement in sound editing
“Mad Max: Fury Road” Mark Mangini and David White**
“The Martian” Oliver Tarney
“The Revenant” Martin Hernandez and Lon Bender
“Sicario” Alan Robert Murray
“Star Wars: The Force Awakens” Matthew Wood and David Acord

Achievement in sound mixing

“Bridge of Spies” Andy Nelson, Gary Rydstrom and Drew Kunin
“Mad Max: Fury Road” Chris Jenkins, Gregg Rudloff and Ben Osmo**
“The Martian” Paul Massey, Mark Taylor and Mac Ruth
“The Revenant” Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño, Randy Thom and Chris Duesterdiek
“Star Wars: The Force Awakens” Andy Nelson, Christopher Scarabosio and Stuart Wilson

Achievement in costume design

“Carol” Sandy Powell
“Cinderella” Sandy Powell
“The Danish Girl” Paco Delgado
“Mad Max: Fury Road” Jenny Beavan**
“The Revenant” Jacqueline West

Achievement in makeup and hairstyling
“Mad Max: Fury Road” Lesley Vanderwalt, Elka Wardega and Damian Martin**
“The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out the Window and Disappeared” Love Larson and Eva von Bahr
“The Revenant” Siân Grigg, Duncan Jarman and Robert Pandini

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original score)

“Bridge of Spies” Thomas Newman
“Carol” Carter Burwell
“The Hateful Eight” Ennio Morricone**
“Sicario” Jóhann Jóhannsson
“Star Wars: The Force Awakens” John Williams

Ennio Morricone’s score isn’t a great one, but it includes quite a distinctive, sinister and haunting theme, which is adapted well into other tracks as well, which is why I think the Academy will pick The Hateful Eight for this one. In my opinion though, it should be Carol.

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original song)
“Earned It” from “Fifty Shades of Grey”
Music and Lyric by Abel Tesfaye, Ahmad Balshe, Jason Daheala Quenneville and Stephan Moccio
“Manta Ray” from “Racing Extinction”
Music by J. Ralph and Lyric by Antony Hegarty
“Simple Song #3” from “Youth”
Music and Lyric by David Lang
“Til It Happens To You” from “The Hunting Ground”
Music and Lyric by Diane Warren and Lady Gaga**
“Writing’s On The Wall” from “Spectre”
Music and Lyric by Jimmy Napes and Sam Smith

Best foreign language film of the year
“Embrace of the Serpent” Colombia
“Mustang” France
“Son of Saul” Hungary**
“Theeb” Jordan
“A War” Denmark

Best animated short film
“Bear Story” Gabriel Osorio and Pato Escala
“Prologue” Richard Williams and Imogen Sutton
“Sanjay’s Super Team” Sanjay Patel and Nicole Grindle**
“We Can’t Live without Cosmos” Konstantin Bronzit
“World of Tomorrow” Don Hertzfeldt

Best live action short film

“Ave Maria” Basil Khalil and Eric Dupont**
“Day One” Henry Hughes
“Everything Will Be Okay (Alles Wird Gut)” Patrick Vollrath
“Shok” Jamie Donoughue
“Stutterer” Benjamin Cleary and Serena Armitage

Best documentary feature
“Amy” Asif Kapadia and James Gay-Rees**
“Cartel Land” Matthew Heineman and Tom Yellin
“The Look of Silence” Joshua Oppenheimer and Signe Byrge Sørensen
“What Happened, Miss Simone?” Liz Garbus, Amy Hobby and Justin Wilkes
“Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom” Evgeny Afineevsky and Den Tolmor

Best documentary short subject
“Body Team 12” David Darg and Bryn Mooser**
“Chau, beyond the Lines” Courtney Marsh and Jerry Franck
“Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah” Adam Benzine
“A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness” Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy
“Last Day of Freedom” Dee Hibbert-Jones and Nomi Talisman